Monday, March 8, 2010

Spring Break 2010

I am in Albuquerque, NM, visiting Candace during my Spring Break joining us is Michelle from Canada. So it is an international meeting. LOL.

Michelle and her husband, Rod, arrived last week and will stay until Wednesday. They planned their visit to overlap my visit. It is wonderful to see New Mexico through their eyes. Although they were both born in England, they currently live in Nova Scotia. Candace and Michelle are working on (1) a presentation that Michelle will give in May, (2) the continuation of the same presentation which will be part of the contributed session that the cluster group has organized for the Joint Statistical Meetings (JSM) in Vancouver in August, and (3) Structual Equation Modeling.

The contributed session for JSM is titled: Evidence-based Education: Improving Teaching and Learning through Understanding Students' Attitudes. If I recall correctly, the papers that will be presented are (1) Expectancy Value Theory presentation, (2) Candace and Michelle's paper on best way to analyze pre- post- data using several SATS data sets, (3) a paper on a simulation concerning analyzing SATS data, and (4) my presentation of the work that Gloria and I are doing concerning students' perception of statistics. I think that is the session. I'll try to post the "official" names soon.

Today, I am working on The SATS Project. We have 33 different course sections this semester which is way too many for us to handle. We need funding to fully pay an administrator to handle the data collection. So one of the objectives prior to Fall data collection is to write a document which says "sorry, we can't collect your data," and we need to determine an ideal number of sections which we can handle (15 sections???) But if we find funding, then we can collect from lots more sections.

The paper for The American Statistician will be finalized during this trip. Yeah!

Well, I best get back to work.

1 comment:

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